Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
Schenectady is the Casino winner (or loser)
Rotterdam NY...the people's voice    Rotterdam's Virtual Internet Community    Outside Rotterdam  ›  Schenectady is the Casino winner (or loser) Moderators: Admin
Users Browsing Forum
AdSense, Googlebot and 9 Guests

Schenectady is the Casino winner (or loser)  This thread currently has 14,345 views. |
15 Pages « ... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 » Recommend Thread
joebxr
December 21, 2015, 4:31pm Report to Moderator

Hero Member
Posts
6,439
Reputation
70.00%
Reputation Score
+14 / -6
Time Online
270 days 11 hours 47 minutes


Nevada and Louisiana have legalized gambling for the entire state.  Anyone who wants to put a casino, slot machines, etc. in their hotel or other place of business has to get a licence through the state gambling commission/agency.  No one has accused Nevada nor Louisiana for having large governments.  Nevada has had state-wide legalized gambling since 1931 and it has brought in much revenue to the state and local governments during that time.  Never heard of taxpayers complaining that it cost them too much or anything to run.
Bottomline - it is the fairest way to run things.  If it is good enough for a half dozen or so groups of people to get a casino licence than it should be good enough for anyone - anywhere - in the state to run a gambling operation.  Let teh market determine who succeeds and where they succeed/

"Both state and local governments impose licensing and zoning restrictions"
They established the Government controls and limitations upfront, so Government size was already established to
monitor and control the activity. NYS has a small (considering) gamin commission that controls small (considering)
regional gambling. It is not possible to expand gambling per your opinion, without growing government to monitor it.
I don't have the numbers, but I bet that the Government agencies responsible for oversight of gambling have already/will
increase in size to manage the newer, non-Indian casinos.


JUST BECAUSE SISSY SAYS SO DOESN'T MAKE IT SO...BUT HE THINKS IT DOES!!!!!  
JUST BECAUSE MC1 SAYS SO DOESN'T MAKE IT SO!!!!!  
Logged
Private Message Reply: 180 - 224
joebxr
December 21, 2015, 5:57pm Report to Moderator

Hero Member
Posts
6,439
Reputation
70.00%
Reputation Score
+14 / -6
Time Online
270 days 11 hours 47 minutes
and.....
Why would anyone complain....

Louisiana
Taxes as a Percentage of Home Value: 0.51 percent
Median Property Tax Paid on Homes: $714
In large part because of gambling.

Nevada
NO income tax, almost entirely due to gambling


JUST BECAUSE SISSY SAYS SO DOESN'T MAKE IT SO...BUT HE THINKS IT DOES!!!!!  
JUST BECAUSE MC1 SAYS SO DOESN'T MAKE IT SO!!!!!  
Logged
Private Message Reply: 181 - 224
DemocraticVoiceOfReason
December 21, 2015, 8:00pm Report to Moderator

Hero Member
Posts
12,321
Reputation
20.83%
Reputation Score
+10 / -38
Time Online
151 days 7 hours 5 minutes
Quoted from joebxr

"Both state and local governments impose licensing and zoning restrictions"
They established the Government controls and limitations upfront, so Government size was already established to
monitor and control the activity. NYS has a small (considering) gamin commission that controls small (considering)
regional gambling. It is not possible to expand gambling per your opinion, without growing government to monitor it.
I don't have the numbers, but I bet that the Government agencies responsible for oversight of gambling have already/will
increase in size to manage the newer, non-Indian casinos.


I am not certain that your theory is relevant to Nevada's experience - "government size was already established."  In 1931, Nevada found itself near broke and needed a way out of the depression.  So it legalized gambling and divorce statewide - I don't know why they came up with that combination - but they did and it worked.  Soon folks were coming to Nevada to gamble and/or get divorces.  Reno, Las Vegas and other towns became draws for those folks.  
I am pretty sure that Nevada didn't already have the "government size" in place to "monitor and control the activity."   It had to grow and evolve, as needed, over the years.
Bottomline - you can find casinos and gaming operations all across Nevada - not just in Las Vegas or Reno.  You can find slot machines in bars, gas stations, supermarkets and convenience stores.  Apparently, any business can have up to 15 slot machines if it gets a licence.    So the "ma and pa" businesses are able to get in on the gambling action and revenue stream -- not just the select oligarchy that New York State has crowned to run casinos and gaming here.


George Amedore & Christian Klueg for NYS Senate 2016
Pete Vroman for State Assembly 2016[/size][/color]

"For this is what America is all about. It is the uncrossed desert and the unclimbed ridge. It is the star that is not reached and the harvest that is sleeping in the unplowed ground."
Lyndon Baines Johnson
Logged
Private Message Reply: 182 - 224
RPEGCL
December 24, 2015, 12:56pm Report to Moderator

Sr. Member
Posts
381
Reputation
100.00%
Reputation Score
+2 / -0
Time Online
20 days 8 hours 28 minutes
Putting in more gambling is not going to magically create more gamblers. Those who gamble with their money will just have another place to do it. Just moving the funds around till the next shinny place opens up.

So put in fifty new casinos or slot machines in every bathroom, and you'll find more people who can't afford to lose, losing more. The Vegas/Nevada model can not be repeated just by putting in a little hotel casino in downtown Schenectady or putting slot machines in around the state.

Vegas is destination for tourists with more than just gambling. With its hotels, headliner shows, race track, thrill rides, golfing, Zoological-Botanical Park, and nearby tourist attractions like Lake Mead and the Hover Dam, the north rim of the Grand Canyon, Zion national park, OH and yes casinos. It has so much more to offer unlike Schenectady NY.
Logged Offline
Private Message Reply: 183 - 224
DemocraticVoiceOfReason
December 25, 2015, 8:07am Report to Moderator

Hero Member
Posts
12,321
Reputation
20.83%
Reputation Score
+10 / -38
Time Online
151 days 7 hours 5 minutes
Quoted from RPEGCL
Putting in more gambling is not going to magically create more gamblers. Those who gamble with their money will just have another place to do it. Just moving the funds around till the next shinny place opens up.

So put in fifty new casinos or slot machines in every bathroom, and you'll find more people who can't afford to lose, losing more. The Vegas/Nevada model can not be repeated just by putting in a little hotel casino in downtown Schenectady or putting slot machines in around the state.

Vegas is destination for tourists with more than just gambling. With its hotels, headliner shows, race track, thrill rides, golfing, Zoological-Botanical Park, and nearby tourist attractions like Lake Mead and the Hover Dam, the north rim of the Grand Canyon, Zion national park, OH and yes casinos. It has so much more to offer unlike Schenectady NY.


Gambling created Las Vegas as we know it.  Las Vegas wasn't much more than a gas station and a few tumbleweeds when gambling was legalized in Nevada in 1931.  If someone were to pull the plug on gambling - Las Vegas would turn into a ghost town.

Schenectady has a lot to offer.  It is a great place to live in, work in and to visit.



George Amedore & Christian Klueg for NYS Senate 2016
Pete Vroman for State Assembly 2016[/size][/color]

"For this is what America is all about. It is the uncrossed desert and the unclimbed ridge. It is the star that is not reached and the harvest that is sleeping in the unplowed ground."
Lyndon Baines Johnson
Logged
Private Message Reply: 184 - 224
senders
June 5, 2016, 2:28pm Report to Moderator
Hero Member
Posts
29,331
Reputation
70.97%
Reputation Score
+22 / -9
Time Online
155 days 8 hours 34 minutes
Quoted Text
Casinos that do stay in business yield less to their towns and states. Revenues from Maryland’s first casino, in Perryville, at the northern tip of Chesapeake Bay, have already dropped 30 percent from their peak in 2008, and are expected to decline even more rapidly in future as competitors proliferate.

Yet the truly bad news about casinos is not found in the tax receipts. It’s found in the casinos' economic and social impact on the towns that welcome them.

Until the late 1970s, no state except Nevada permitted casino gambling. Then Atlantic City persuaded its state legislature to allow casinos, in hope of reviving the prosperity of the battered resort town. Hotels sprung up along the seafront. Thousands of people were hired. And the rest of Atlantic City … saw no benefits at all. All these years later, it still has desperate trouble sustaining even a single grocery store.

No one should look to casinos to revive cities, “because that’s not what casinos do.” So explained the project manager for a new Wynn casino rising near Philadelphia. He’s right, but it has taken a surprisingly long time for city governments to acknowledge a fact that was well understood by the 19th-century Americans who suppressed gambling in the decades after the Civil War.


...you are a product of your environment, your environment is a product of your priorities, your priorities are a product of you......

The replacement of morality and conscience with law produces a deadly paradox.


STOP BEING GOOD DEMOCRATS---STOP BEING GOOD REPUBLICANS--START BEING GOOD AMERICANS

Logged Offline
Private Message Reply: 185 - 224
senders
June 5, 2016, 2:30pm Report to Moderator
Hero Member
Posts
29,331
Reputation
70.97%
Reputation Score
+22 / -9
Time Online
155 days 8 hours 34 minutes
Quoted Text
Baltimore is a troubled city, as you know from The Wire. Like many troubled cities, Baltimore has turned to casino gambling as its solution. On August 26, a new Caesar’s casino will open on the site of an old chemical factory, a little more than 2 miles from the famous Inner Harbor and Camden Yards baseball stadium. Yet there’s already reason to expect the casino to disappoint everyone involved: the city looking for tax revenues, the workers hoping for jobs, the investors expecting hefty returns.

Outside of Las Vegas—now home to only 20 percent of the nation’s casino industry—casino gambling has evolved into a downscale business. Affluent and educated people visit casinos less often than poorer people do for the same reasons that they smoke less and drink less and weigh less.

Unfortunately for the casino industry’s growth hopes, downscale America has less money to spend today than it did before 2007. Nor is downscale America sharing much in the post-2009 recovery. From a news report on the troubles of a recently opened Ohio casino:

Ameet Patel, general manager of the property, says the softness in casino revenue that he and other operators have seen has been driven by a key demographic: women older than 50 who used to bet $50 to $75 per visit. The weak recovery has squeezed their gambling budgets, and their trips to casinos are fewer, he says.
What’s true in Ohio applies nationwide. Casino revenues had still not recovered their 2007 peaks as of the spring of 2014, when again they went into reverse in most jurisdictions. Moody’s now projects that casino revenues will drop through the rest of 2014 and all of 2015, slicing industry earnings by as much as 7.5 percent.  


Weaker earnings are being divided among ever multiplying numbers of casinos. Baltimore’s casino will be the fourth to open in Maryland, with a fifth soon to rise down the Potomac from Washington, DC. Maryland’s casinos compete with a clutch of new casinos in Philadelphia and Delaware.

Why so much building? Cities are authorizing more casinos for exactly the same reason that the existing casinos are losing business: the weak national economy. Casinos promise a new and easy flow of revenues to hard pressed local governments.

The promise however comes increasingly hedged with fine print.

The casino market is nearing saturation, if it is not already saturated. Two casinos have closed in Mississippi this year. Four have closed or will soon close in Atlantic City, including the glitziest hotel on the boardwalk, Revel.  

Despite its gambling industry, Atlantic City still has trouble sustaining even a single grocery store.
Casinos that do stay in business yield less to their towns and states. Revenues from Maryland’s first casino, in Perryville, at the northern tip of Chesapeake Bay, have already dropped 30 percent from their peak in 2008, and are expected to decline even more rapidly in future as competitors proliferate.

Yet the truly bad news about casinos is not found in the tax receipts. It’s found in the casinos' economic and social impact on the towns that welcome them.

Until the late 1970s, no state except Nevada permitted casino gambling. Then Atlantic City persuaded its state legislature to allow casinos, in hope of reviving the prosperity of the battered resort town. Hotels sprung up along the seafront. Thousands of people were hired. And the rest of Atlantic City … saw no benefits at all. All these years later, it still has desperate trouble sustaining even a single grocery store.

No one should look to casinos to revive cities, “because that’s not what casinos do.” So explained the project manager for a new Wynn casino rising near Philadelphia. He’s right, but it has taken a surprisingly long time for city governments to acknowledge a fact that was well understood by the 19th-century Americans who suppressed gambling in the decades after the Civil War.


...you are a product of your environment, your environment is a product of your priorities, your priorities are a product of you......

The replacement of morality and conscience with law produces a deadly paradox.


STOP BEING GOOD DEMOCRATS---STOP BEING GOOD REPUBLICANS--START BEING GOOD AMERICANS

Logged Offline
Private Message Reply: 186 - 224
senders
June 5, 2016, 2:31pm Report to Moderator
Hero Member
Posts
29,331
Reputation
70.97%
Reputation Score
+22 / -9
Time Online
155 days 8 hours 34 minutes
Quoted Text
2- Casinos Cannibalize Existing Business
Economic Damage

2. A Casino monopoly would cannibalize existing NH businesses.

Because it would depend primarily upon New Hampshire residents for revenue, a convenience casino here would displace consumer spending from existing, local New Hampshire businesses, such as restaurants, hotels, conference centers, entertainment venues, and retailers ranging from auto dealers to food and clothing stores.

Midrange estimates of this displacement, or cannibalization effect, are 50-60 percent. This means that a single border-casino generating $75 million in annual taxes (at the proposed 25% tax rate on slots gross win) would drain at least $200 million in annual revenues from existing New Hampshire businesses, most locally owned and operated.

New Hampshire casinos would subject thousands of existing New Hampshire businesses to an unfair and anti-competitive disadvantage.

Here’s how. Casinos throughout the U.S. always use monopoly slots profits to “comp” (discount below cost or give away for free) rooms, meals, drinks, entertainment, and other amenities. Using standard casino comp/gross profit ratios (2011 Atlantic City data), a single Salem casino would comp at least $100 million in these amenities annually.

Local businesses recycle revenues and profits back into the local economy to a greater extent than would an out-of-state company proposing a casino here. The local businesses harmed by this unfair competition from casino monopolies are often integral parts of our local community life.

Casino cannibalization also kills existing New Hampshire jobs. The New Hampshire Gaming Study Commission, 2010, (see page GSC 70), found that a North Country casino would wipe out 7 existing local/regional jobs for each 10 casino jobs.

Experts on casino cannibalization have stated:

A Federal Reserve Bank of Boston cannibalization study found that, “Casinos that cater to a local market generally do not bring outside money into the economy through the spending of its patrons … Residents patronizing such casinos may simply substitute gambling for other goods and services.”
Manchester business leader Steve Talarico commenting on a potential Salem casino: “It’s going to suck all the business out of Manchester.”
Ledyard, Connecticut’s Mayor, “There has been no economic development spin-off from the [Foxwoods] casino … Gamblers have one thing in mind: get to the casino, win or lose their money, get in their cars, and go home.”
Donald Trump: “People will spend a tremendous amount of money in casinos, money that they would normally spend on buying a refrigerator or a new car. Local businesses lose customer dollars to casinos.”
Steve Wynn, addressing Bridgeport, Connecticut business leaders, “There is no reason on earth for any of you to expect for more than a second that just because there are people here, they’re going to run into your restaurants and stores just because we build this [casino] here.


...you are a product of your environment, your environment is a product of your priorities, your priorities are a product of you......

The replacement of morality and conscience with law produces a deadly paradox.


STOP BEING GOOD DEMOCRATS---STOP BEING GOOD REPUBLICANS--START BEING GOOD AMERICANS

Logged Offline
Private Message Reply: 187 - 224
bumblethru
December 19, 2016, 9:29am Report to Moderator
Hero Member
Posts
30,704
Reputation
78.26%
Reputation Score
+36 / -10
Time Online
138 days 14 hours 16 minutes
ya....right!!!
they JUST found it!!!!!
Do they think we all drink the Kool Aid????
IDIOTS!!




Quoted Text
Schenectady casino site yields 5K tons of contaminated soil
Contaminated water and soil removed; DEC will keep monitoring levels

By Lauren Stanforth Updated 9:26 am, Monday, December 19, 2016


Schenectady
The state has determined that while the environmental cleanup of the Rivers Casino and Mohawk Harbor properties is complete, the work uncovered massive amounts of contaminated soil and water that were not part of the original remediation plans.

The Department of Environmental Conservation recently said that during the redevelopment of the site, where the Rivers Casino will open in February, additional contamination was discovered that resulted in the excavation of 2,800 more tons of petroleum-laced soil and the treatment of 250,600 gallons of contaminated groundwater.

The DEC also said that groundwater will continue to be monitored, and that "actions have also been taken to ensure that any remaining contamination will not affect the indoor air quality of any future buildings."

http://www.timesunion.com/news.....6.php#photo-12064662


When the INSANE are running the ASYLUM
In individuals, insanity is rare; but in groups, parties, nations and epochs, it is the rule. -- Friedrich Nietzsche


“How fortunate for those in power that people never think.”
Adolph Hitler
Logged
Private Message Reply: 188 - 224
CICERO
December 19, 2016, 10:39am Report to Moderator

Hero Member
Posts
17,995
Reputation
68.00%
Reputation Score
+17 / -8
Time Online
686 days 16 hours 20 minutes
I'd love to know the PPM level for PCB'S on that site.


Logged Offline
Private Message Reply: 189 - 224
RPEGCL
December 21, 2016, 4:00pm Report to Moderator

Sr. Member
Posts
381
Reputation
100.00%
Reputation Score
+2 / -0
Time Online
20 days 8 hours 28 minutes
http://www.npr.org/2016/12/16/.....e-older-slot-players

Casinos' Demographic Problem: How To Replace Older Slot Players

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Casinos have a gambling problem. Young people are not playing slot machines the way their parents and grandparents did, so casinos are hoping to bring in new players with a new kind of game. Elizabeth Kulas from our Planet Money podcast went to Atlantic City.

ELIZABETH KULAS, BYLINE: It's early Friday night at Harrah's. The casino gaming floor is filled with sound effects and flashing lights and psychedelic carpet. And someone who's spent almost 40 years working in places like this is John Acres. He's kind of a legend in the casino business. He invented the player loyalty card. Last year, he was inducted into the gaming hall of fame. He says, though, if you can look past the sensory overload, something is missing.

JOHN ACRES: The existing players that we have are aging out, and younger people are not coming in to replace them.

KULAS: John says Gen Xers and millennials - people under 45 - they do come to casinos, but...

ACRES: They come to go to clubs. They come to go shopping. They come to go to the pools. They don't come to gamble.

KULAS: John says, when we can stream just about anything we want from home, casino favorites like slots are struggling to hold their attention and generate revenue. It's a problem that Blaine Graboyes thinks he might be able to solve. Graboyes is the co-founder of New York-based Game Co. Right here at Harrah's, the company recently launched "Danger Arena," the world's first video game gambling machine.

Looks like Schenectady is doomed...no shopping no clubs no pools but we will have gambling...
Oh right the younger people do do that. Lets hope they install some of these costly video game systems to get the people not on fixed incomes off their couches.

Logged Offline
Private Message Reply: 190 - 224
CICERO
December 21, 2016, 4:15pm Report to Moderator

Hero Member
Posts
17,995
Reputation
68.00%
Reputation Score
+17 / -8
Time Online
686 days 16 hours 20 minutes
Quoted from RPEGCL


Looks like Schenectady is doomed...no shopping no clubs no pools but we will have gambling...
Oh right the younger people do do that. Lets hope they install some of these costly video game systems to get the people not on fixed incomes off their couches.



The casino will collect some of the black market drug and prostitution money that currently goes untaxed.  The casino is the poor man's tax.  The casino will be attended by the few rich, many poor and working poor, and degenerate gamblers.  


Logged Offline
Private Message Reply: 191 - 224
joebxr
December 21, 2016, 4:16pm Report to Moderator

Hero Member
Posts
6,439
Reputation
70.00%
Reputation Score
+14 / -6
Time Online
270 days 11 hours 47 minutes
Quoted from CICERO


The casino will collect some of the black market drug and prostitution money that currently goes untaxed.  The casino is the poor man's tax.  The casino will be attended by the few rich, many poor and working poor, and myself and a few other degenerate gamblers.  




JUST BECAUSE SISSY SAYS SO DOESN'T MAKE IT SO...BUT HE THINKS IT DOES!!!!!  
JUST BECAUSE MC1 SAYS SO DOESN'T MAKE IT SO!!!!!  
Logged
Private Message Reply: 192 - 224
CICERO
December 21, 2016, 5:12pm Report to Moderator

Hero Member
Posts
17,995
Reputation
68.00%
Reputation Score
+17 / -8
Time Online
686 days 16 hours 20 minutes
Quoted from joebxr




Nah...I don't gamble on games of chance that are clearly rigged in the houses favor.  


Logged Offline
Private Message Reply: 193 - 224
joebxr
December 21, 2016, 6:02pm Report to Moderator

Hero Member
Posts
6,439
Reputation
70.00%
Reputation Score
+14 / -6
Time Online
270 days 11 hours 47 minutes
Quoted from CICERO


Nah...I don't gamble on games of chance that are clearly rigged in the houses favor.  

Yah...casinos don't make millions/yr because the bettors win a lot...unless they are pros or card counters.
They do however rely on all the small bettors that hope to hit it big...that is their bread and butter.


JUST BECAUSE SISSY SAYS SO DOESN'T MAKE IT SO...BUT HE THINKS IT DOES!!!!!  
JUST BECAUSE MC1 SAYS SO DOESN'T MAKE IT SO!!!!!  
Logged
Private Message Reply: 194 - 224
15 Pages « ... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 » Recommend Thread
|

Rotterdam NY...the people's voice    Rotterdam's Virtual Internet Community    Outside Rotterdam  ›  Schenectady is the Casino winner (or loser)

Thread Rating
There is currently no rating for this thread